About

Tig and Elise Tillinghast started Tillinghast Maple Farms in Thetford Center, Vermont. They live and work there with their two bird dogs and a border collie mutt.

tig-and-ellie

Friends make the whole effort possible. Key players in the maple operation include Robert Thurston and his two boys Robert and John. Carolyn Thurston helps with the boiling, and keeps everyone gaining weight during the season with her cooking. It’s not just the smell of maple syrup that lures passers-by into the sugarhouse.

bumper-bone-robert-roof

Robert, Bumper and Bone built the monitor

The sugarshack and the sugar bush itself wouldn’t exist were it not for a persistent line of families who through the years kept up the old buildings, conserved the land and managed the forest in such a manner to let Hubbard Hill do what it really always wanted to do: grow maples.

Today we tap more than 2,200 trees here that two generations of owners knew they’d never live to tap. We also buy in sap and syrup from thousands of additional trees in forests up the same ridge. Every day we spend out in the woods, we see evidence that those former owners actively made decisions to ensure that someday somebody would have the opportunity to make this maple syrup harvest.

The pictures below show the shack over the hundred or so years.

Viewfromhouse-small

(turn of 20th Century)

sugarshack 1947

(1947)

Viewfromhouse 60s small

(1967)

2007 shack winter

(2007)

Tig and Elise Tillinghast started Tillinghast Maple Farms in Thetford Center, Vermont. They live and work there with their two bird dogs and a border collie mutt.
Friends make the whole effort possible. Key players in the maple operation include Robert Thurston and his two boys Robert and John. Carolyn Thurston helps with the boiling, and keeps everyone gaining weight during the season with her cooking. It’s not just the smell of maple syrup that lures passers-by into the sugarhouse.
Robert, Bumper and Bone built the monitor
The sugarshack and the sugar bush itself wouldn’t exist were it not for a persistent line of families who through the years kept up the old buildings, conserved the land and managed the forest in such a manner to let Hubbard Hill do what it really always wanted to do: grow maples.
Today we tap more than 500 trees here that two generations of owners knew they’d never live to tap. We also tap another 1,000 trees in a second bush up the same ridge. Every day we spend out in the woods, we see evidence that those former owners actively made decisions to ensure that someday somebody would have the opportunity to make this maple syrup harvest.
The pictures below show the shack over the hundred or so years.
(turn of 20th Century)
(1947)
(1967)
(2007)