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Category: Sap Sugar Content

Voice from Past as the Maple Syrup Season Slows

In maple sugaring, the equipment that claims the cruelest name is the “extractor,” a device that sounds like it preys on maple trees. What it really does is separate out the sap flowing down toward a vacuum system and puts it into a storage tank without interrupting the flow of vacuum to the tree. [The […]

Late in the Season, Getting on Evening

It’s been a couple days since we last boiled, as the sap flow has slowed with the warming weather, and along with it our maple syrup production. The boil we did do, though, was a doozy, with steam coming out in clouds, the wind taking it in all directions, once sending it down Tucker Hill […]

A Great Maple Syrup Research Compendium

Back in 1982, the Northeastern Forest Experiment Station put together a large series of studies into one document to help sugar makers employ some of the more interesting recent findings. That document is available here. Some highlights: – A good deal of what we know (which is still pretty incomplete) about how and why sap […]

Maple Syrup Grades Explained

Different states will have slightly different terms sometimes, but syrup grade systems are essentially the same: they all are based solely on the color of the syrup, and the lighter the syrup the “higher” the grade. In Vermont, the grades start at Grade A Fancy and move on, in order, to Grade A Medium Amber, […]

How Maple Syrup Gets Made – The Quick and Dirty Version

This overview shows how people take the fluid in the veins of trees and concentrate it to make maple syrup. You can search this site for more specific articles on each aspect, but here it is briefly all in one place. For some unknown reason, sugar maple trees produce much, much more sap and much […]

How to Correct Your Hydrometer Reading for Different Sap Temperatures

When you let concentrated sap cool a little bit, the hydrometer reading will be slightly off from its indicated scale. This is a table of temperatures (on the left) of the sap, and the reading you should look for (on the right) where the actual density of the sap will be Vermont’s mark for syrup, which is 67.1.
Many hydrometers are geared to give you this reading at 55 degrees Fahrenheit, and you will notice that the table below shows this temperature as the only one not requiring correction.


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